Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

DNR weekend reading: Magnetic fields guide salmon home

March 9, 2014
State trust land

Fog and below-freezing temperatures combine to give the illusion of recent snowfall on a tract of DNR-managed state trust land in Pend Oreille County. Photo: James Hartley/DNR.

Here are links to articles about recent research, discoveries and other news about forests, climate, energy and other science topics gathered by DNR for your weekend reading:

Oregon State UniversityStudy confirms link between salmon migration and magnetic field
The Earth’s magnetic field may explain how fish can navigate across thousands of miles of water to find their river of origin, say scientists following experiments at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center in the Alsea River basin.

Cornell UniversityDeer proliferation disrupts a forest’s natural growth
Cornell researchers have discovered that a burgeoning deer population forever alters the progression of a forest’s natural future by creating environmental havoc in the soil and disrupting the soil’s natural seed banks.

Science DailyWhat has happened to the tsunami debris from Japan?
The driftage generated by the tragic 2011 tsunami in Japan gave scientists a unique chance to learn more about the effects of the ocean and wind on floating materials as they move across the North Pacific Ocean.

Harvard UniversityInfrared: A new renewable energy source?
Physicists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences envision using current technologies to create a device that would harvest energy from Earth’s infrared emissions into outer space.

Rec Alert: Murdock Beach access road open after brief closure for soil testing

March 6, 2014

Ruby Beach, located on the Washington Coast. Photo: Jane Chavey/ DNR

All work has been completed and the Murdock Beach access forest road is once again open to the public.

Thank you for your patience!

Original article posted February 27, 2014:

Rec Alert: Murdock Beach access road to close for soil testing
The forest road that accesses Murdock Beach will be closed Tuesday, March 4 and Wednesday, March 5 for soil testing.

Murdock Beach, located on the Strait of Juan de Fuca, will not be accessible during this time.

The temporary closure will be at the junction of US Highway 112 and forest road PA-S-2500. This will block access to the PA-S-2510 beach access road and the PA-S-2600 forest access road.

Why will the road be closed?
The DNR Timber Sales program will be taking core samples of the forest road to determine soil suitability. This is a step in preparing for a fish barrier culvert removal.

Murdock Beach access road closure

The forest road that accesses Murdock Beach will be closed March 4 – 5. Click image to enlarge.

For updates on the closure, please visit DNR’s recreation updates page. Closure updates will also be posted on DNR’s Facebook and Twitter sites.

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DNR weekend reading: Earthquake lights, tallest trees, and more

March 1, 2014
hoarfrost

Hoarfrost in Capitol State Forest near Fall Creek campground. Photo: Bryan Hamlin/DNR

Here are links to articles about recent research, discoveries and other news about forests, climate, energy and other science topics gathered by DNR for your weekend reading:

Nature: Earthquake lights linked to rift zones
A new catalogue of earthquake lights — mysterious glows sometimes reported before or during seismic shaking — finds that they happen most often in geological rift environments, where the ground is pulling apart. The work is the latest to tackle the enigmatic lights, which have been described by eyewitnesses for centuries but are yet to be fully explained by scientists.

Science Daily: Temperature Most Significant Driver of World’s Tallest Trees
The tallest specimens of the world’s nine tallest tree species grow in climates with an unusually small seasonal temperature variation. Understanding the role of temperature in driving tree height, may help scientists forecast how forests adapt to climate change.

University of California-BerkeleySuburban Sprawl Cancels Carbon Footprint Savings of Dense Urban Cores
According to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, population-dense cities contribute less greenhouse gas emissions per person than other areas of the country, but these cities’ extensive suburbs essentially wipe out the climate benefits.

University of California-Santa Barbara: Cities Support More Native Biodiversity Than Previously Thought
Rapid conversion of natural lands to cement-dominated urban centers is causing great losses in biodiversity. Yet, according to a new study involving 147 cities worldwide, surprisingly high numbers of plant and animal species persist and even flourish in urban environment.

environment360: Urban Nature: How to Foster Biodiversity in World’s Cities
As the world becomes more urbanized, researchers and city managers from Baltimore to Britain are recognizing the importance of providing urban habitat that can support biodiversity.

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DNR offices closed today, but here is some fun reading from DNR’s time travel machine

February 17, 2014
Doug-fir

DNR Forester Jesse Steele with old growth Douglas-fir estimated to be 250-300 years old. Photo by: DNR

This Douglas-fir has seen a lot in its lifetime on the Olympic Peninsula. DNR conducted an old growth assessment and concluded that the tree is between 250 and 300 years old. It may already have been standing in the forest when the first U.S. President George Washington was born 282 years ago this week. Today, like each year on the third Monday of February, we celebrate our nation’s presidents.

Can you imagine what changes have taken place since this tree was a seedling more than 250 years ago?

251 years ago – When this tree was young, Benjamin Franklin was conducting experiments to uncover the complexities of lightning and electricity.

225 years ago – By the time George Washington was elected president in 1789, this tree was already as old as most of the ones you see in our forests today.

203 – 207 years ago – When Abraham Lincoln was born in 1809, Washington State was already rapidly undergoing many of the changes that would shape it into the community we know today. Just four years before Lincoln’s birth the Lewis and Clark Expedition entered the area that is now Washington State. Two years after Lincoln was born David Thompson sailed down and completing the first formal mapping of the Columbia River.

125 years ago – The State of Washington was admitted to the Union on November 11, 1889. That year the U.S. government endowed the state with 3.2 million acres of trust land.

57 years ago – The Washington State Department of Natural Resources was established — just over 150 years after our first president began his term in office. The new agency combined seven agencies and boards, including the Commissioner of Public Lands who administers the state trust lands and DNR.

Florian doug fir

DNR Forester Florian Deisenhofer with a Douglas-fir estimated to be over 400 years old. Photo: Dan Friesz/DNR.

49 years ago - The first formal DNR recreation sites were created in 1965.

43 years ago – In 1971, Washington State legislature stopped the sales of state tidelands and shorelands, and the State Environmental Policy Act was established. The following year, DNR was selected to manage natural area preserves, and the first natural resource conservation areas were established.

Washington State has come a long way since the days of those first presidents. We can celebrate history and the accomplishments of our country and state today while remembering these majestic old growth trees that have seen it all.

Happy President’s Day!

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Great Backyard Bird Count – It’s free, fun & easy!

February 15, 2014

The Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) is an annual four-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of bird populations. Participants are asked to count birds for as little as 15 minutes (or as long as they wish) on one or more days of the event and report their sightings online at www.birdcount.org. Anyone can take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count, from beginning bird watchers to experts, and you can now participate from anywhere in the world! 

Evening Grosbeak -- Photo by GBBC participant Carrie

Evening Grosbeak — Photo by GBBC participant Carrie

Fun for the whole family!
Each checklist submitted during the GBBC helps researchers at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society learn more about how birds are doing, and how to protect them and the environment we share. Last year, participants turned in more than 134,000 online checklists, creating the world’s largest instantaneous snapshot of bird populations ever recorded.

The 17th annual GBBC will be held Friday, February 14, through Monday, February 17, 2014. To learn more visit the official website at www.birdcount.org.

For more on the results of the 2013 GBBC, take a look at the full summary, and be sure to check out some of the images in the 2013 GBBC Photo Contest Gallery.

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Plan your V-Day getaway on DNR recreation lands

February 14, 2014

Happy Valentine’s Day!! Wait, did you forget…?

Plan a fun trip to DNR-managed recreation lands this Valentine's Day!

Plan a fun trip to DNR-managed recreation lands this Valentine’s Day!

Still scrambling to plan a romantic getaway? Or perhaps searching for a single’s adventure to escape all the hearts and flowers?

Plan your trip today at www.dnr.wa.gov/recreation.

Just because you forgot to plan Valentine’s Day, doesn’t mean you should go unprepared. 

Remember:

Have fun!

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Wish you were here?

February 13, 2014
High Hut at Mount Tahoma

Book your adventure to the Mount Tahoma Snow Huts on DNR-managed state trust lands today at http://www.skimtta.com/huts.htm

Winter recreation season is finally in full swing. The mountains are covered in snow and Eastern Washington’s trails are groomed and ready for snowmobiling, skiing, and snowshoeing.

Planning a trip to see the snow? We at DNR want you to have the opportunity to enjoy some winter outdoor adventures, but we want you to be safe.

mountain bikers riding a snowy trail

Winter outdoor recreation takes many shapes on DNR-managed lands.
Photo: Randy Warnock/DNR

Safety first for winter recreation
Whether you snowshoe, cross country ski, hike, or snowmobile, you should be prepared.

Here are some tips to follow for a safe and enjoyable trip:

Snow mobile

Don’t get out on the trails without proper permits! Make it a fun day and know before you go.
Photo: Chuck Lamica, DNR

Snowmobilers
Snowmobilers should follow all of the aforementioned as well as know their ability to ride on or off groomed trails.

Wear protective equipment with Washington Department of Transportation approved helmets. Never carry a passenger unless the snowmobile is designed for it. Always avoid alcohol while operating a snowmobile and ride responsibly.

Sno-Park Permit, Discover Pass, or both?
Don’t forget to grab your Sno-Park Permit or Discover Pass before you head out.

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Apply for the Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee before February 14

February 10, 2014

Just a reminder, the Washington State departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Fish & Wildlife are now accepting applications through Feb. 14 for the citizen-based Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee.

Teanaway

Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee
This is a citizen-based committee that will advise the agencies as they work together to develop a management plan for the forest.

Apply Before February 14
Follow the web links below to apply for the advisory committee.

mouse graphic• Apply online
• Download a printable application

Learn more online at: http://bit.ly/1ejBKMC

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January’s top blogs: Hiring firefighters, ‘12th man’ earthquake and other stories

February 4, 2014

Here are the blogs we posted in January that drew the most views by Ear to the Ground readers. That’s you! Thanks for reading Ear to the Ground.

20120920-press-briefing-kent-romney1-62 DNR to hire seasonal wildland firefighters
DNR, is recruiting forest firefighters for the 2014 summer season.
Subduction Zone Cascadia subduction zone ruptured 314 years ago; mega earthquake & tsunami hit on Jan. 26, 1700
It’s the 314th anniversary of the (estimated) magnitude 9.0 megathrust earthquake and tsunami that occurred on the Cascadia Subduction Zone.
Seahawk Earthquake DNR geologists cautious about predictions of possible ’12th man’ earthquake this Sunday
Some may wonder if the noise and shaking that Seattle fans generate during games could set off an actual earthquake.
Divers DNR divers remove derelict mooring buoys near Port Hadlock; lawnmower remains elusive
DNR’s dive team and Aquatic Resources staff spent a day removing old, derelict and abandoned mooring buoys, lines and “anchors” from the waters of South Port Townsend Bay.
Laminated Root Rot Groundbreaking research addresses innovative approaches to Douglas fir root diseases
Laminated root rot is becoming more of an issue in Washington State. Why?
Join the conversation about these topics and more on Facebook Facebook Fan

Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee

January 30, 2014

The Washington State departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Fish & Wildlife are now accepting applications through Feb. 14 for the citizen-based Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee.

Teanaway

Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee
This is a citizen-based committee that will advise the agencies as they work together to develop a management plan for the forest.

Apply Before February 14
Follow the web links below to apply for the advisory committee.

mouse graphicApply online
Download a printable application

Teanaway

Apply today to be a part of the Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee.

Advisory Committee Commitment
State lawmakers have directed the agencies to complete the management plan by June 30, 2015.

With that deadline in place, advisory committee members will be asked to make a significant time commitment to develop recommendations to the two agencies.

Meetings will begin later this winter and take place in Kittitas County area.

Other Ways To Contribute
In addition to the advisory committee, there are many ways to participate in developing the Teanaway Community Forest management plan.

These include:

DNR and WDFW will seek significant public input to help develop an inclusive and robust management plan.

The Teanaway Community Forest will be managed through a partnership between DNR and WDFW, with input from the local community and interested stakeholders.

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