Posts Tagged ‘clean up’

Got storm damage?

July 21, 2012

stormdamage

Thunder, lightning, 60-mile per hour winds, flash floods, and wow- ping pong sized hail. Yes, Mother Nature has been pulling out all the stops this July. While we’ve been hiding out from the storm our trees have been taking on the elements. Here’s a quick recap of resources and past DNR blogs to help you care for your trees and know when to contact a certified arborist (see tips below)

Tips for dealing with tree service companies

  • DNR offers these additional tips to consumers seeking a tree service company to deal with downed or damaged trees from the aftermath of storms:
  • Hire a company that is licensed, bonded, insured and employs ISA Certified Arborists. Although Washington requires tree service companies to register with the state, they are not required to adhere to proper pruning standards or even demonstrate pruning knowledge in order to obtain a license.
  • Beware of ‘door-knockers’; their low prices could prove costly. Most reputable companies have business cards, truck signs, and even uniforms that represent a professional level of service.
  • Ask for references, and take time to select a reputable company. Avoid hiring anyone who will top a tree.
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Collaboration once again helps clean up state waters

February 24, 2012
derelict vessel removed

Part of a not-so-pretty picture. Photo from The Columbian.

Another derelict vessel is pulled from the waters of Washington State. Clark County removed a 28-foot sunken boat that had been abandoned last fall in the North Fork of the Lewis River. Many thanks to Clark County for stepping up to take the lead on this vessel. The Derelict Vessel Removal Program in the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will reimburse Clark County for their costs.

The Derelict Vessel Removal Program works with counties and other public partners to help prevent and cleanup these public nuisances that can turn into public safety hazards. In this case, we coached the county through the custody process, posted the intent to take custody of the vessel on our webpage, and the county moved forward with the removal.

Washington’s nationally recognized Derelict Vessel Removal Program has been a model throughout the states. It is the first fully developed tool to address the problem of derelict or abandoned vessels in our waters. The program provides funding and expertise to assist public agencies in the removal and disposal of vessels across the state. Under state law, other ways to address abandoned vessels, including vessels on land, in marinas, and vessels adrift are described in WAC 308-93-275.

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DNR and Key Peninsula Parks restore recreation site in Pierce County

January 9, 2012
Bulkhead stair removal planted with native vegetation at Maple Hollow Park in Pierce County. Photo: Monica Shoemaker/DNR
The removal of creosote-laden stairs and a bulkhead were replaced with native vegetation at Maple Hollow Park in Pierce County. Photo: Monica Shoemaker/DNR

Key Peninsula Parks restores park for public access in Pierce County

The removal of creosote-laden stairs and a bulkhead were replaced with native vegetation at Maple Hollow Park in Pierce County. Key Peninsula Parks , in partnership with DNR’s Aquatic Restoration Program, has restored Maple Hollow tidelands recreation site located in Carr Inlet.  The 1400-foot parcel had been closed for more than 50 years due to budget shortfalls. Key Peninsula Parks has taken the lead on restoring this public recreation site, which now includes: new bathrooms, trails, campsites, and waterfront access. Moreover, Key Peninsula Parks removed the old creosote-treated wooden stairs and bulkhead, and planted native vegetation along the restored shoreline.  DNR provided $10,000 towards this shoreline restoration.  The total cost for the shoreline restoration was approximately $24,800.

For more on DNR’s work around the Sound visit our website.

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KING5-TV: ‘Woodard Bay bats choose logging site for new home’

December 15, 2011
Chapman Bay Pier

Portions of the toxic creosote-tainted Chapman Bay Pier were removed at Woodard Bay Natural Resources Conservation Area. Photo: DNR.

A project to remove toxic creosote-treated wooden structures from Woodard Bay Natural Resources Conservation Area is keeping in mind the new role of the old Chapman Bay Pier there: it is the largest known maternity habitat for bats in Western Washington. KING5 News reported on the project this week.

Between 2,000 and 3,000 Yuma (Yuma myotis) and little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) roost at the old pier during summer months. While removing creosote-treated structures from Woodard Bay, DNR has kept portions of the pier intact to protect the bat roosting habitat but,eventually, will replace it with a safer roosting structure. A DNR video shows some of the work being done.

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Restoring Puget Sound while providing jobs

November 15, 2011

Commissioner Goldmark talks to veteran Phil Hansen, Puget SoundCorps crew supervisor about the opportunity Puget SoundCorps has provided him. Photo: Lauren Stevens/DNR

Commissioner of Public Lands, Peter Goldmark and other officials kicked-off the Puget SoundCorps, Thursday, November 10, 2011. Goldmark honored returning veterans and young adults for removing invasive weeds and replanting hundreds of native plants at the nine-acre Gog-le-hi-te wetland park in Tacoma.

Created in 2011, SoundCorps provides employment opportunities to veterans and young adults (18-25) relying on federal grants. As an extension program of the Washington Conservation Corps (WCC) administered under Ecology, SoundCorps creates jobs that help clean-up and restore lands in the Puget Sound basin. The US Forest Service Urban & Community Forestry Program through DNR provided the funding that hired the crew while Citizens for a Healthy Bay administered the crew and donated more than 50 plants to the cause.

SoundCorps crews typical work includes: 

    • Removal of creosote-treated wood and shoreline structures that damage habitat and pollute the Sound
    • Restoration habitat at toxic cleanup sites.
    • Removal of invasive species.
    • Helping remove barriers for fish, and characterizing stream, habitat and pollution issues
    • Repairing and removing forest roads to keep streams free from sediments.
    • Conducting educational activities that help support the Puget Sound Partnership’s Action Agenda

For more information about the Puget SoundCorps and its partners visit the SoundCorps website

See our photos on Flickr of the Puget SoundCorps kick-off event in Tacoma.

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Are you a veteran or 18-25 year-old looking for work? The new WCC Puget Sound Corps is looking for you.

August 18, 2011
Working to remove creosote-treated pilings and garbage in Puget Sound is ana example of the work Puget Sound Corps crews will be involved with. Photo: DNR

Working to remove creosote-treated pilings and garbage in Puget Sound is an example of the work Puget Sound Corps crews will be involved with. Photo: DNR

The Washington state Departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Ecology, and Washington Conservation Corps (WCC) have joined forces to create the new WCC PugetSound Corps. Administered through Ecology, the state department announced that the Washington Conservation Corps will soon be hiring 245 young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 for work on environmental projects around the state.

In an effort to provide valuable paid employment and education stipends for our veterans and youth, DNR and Ecology created the ‘Puget Sound Corps,’ which was authorized by the legislature this year. The new Corps will focus on the much-needed restoration work in 12 counties that surround Puget Sound, and support the Puget Sound Partnership’s Action Agenda to restore, protect and preserve the Sound by 2020.

For more info, and how to apply, see Ecology’s release.

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Year 1 Milestones: Eagle Harbor agreement leads to safer, cleaner waters

August 16, 2011

Ear to the Ground presents more highlights from the first-year report card on DNR’s Strategic Plan goals.

DNR and the City of Bainbridge worked together to improve navigation and clean up Eagle Harbor. The agreement includes a 12-year lease with the City of Bainbridge Island to operate an open water marina in Eagle Harbor. In addition to paying for the use of state-owned aquatic lands, the City agreed to enforce the agreement’s garbage disposal and sewage rules. The goal is reduce the public health and environmental hazards posed by as many as 60 vessels moored illegally and with people living aboard without proper sewage and waste disposal.

Kitsap Sun: State OKs Lease for Eagle Harbor Liveaboards

Bainbridge Island Review: DNR says marina is official

See more of DNR’s milestones and goals.

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Year 1 Milestones: Creation of Puget SoundCorps; consolidating WCC administration

August 12, 2011
Creosote removal

Removing creosote treated logs from Puget Sound beaches is one of the several tasks that Washington Conservation Corps do each year. Photo: DNR

This week, Ear to the Ground presents highlights from the first-year report card on DNR’s Strategic Plan goals.

A key milestone of DNR’s Strategic Plan achieved during the past year was passage of legislation consolidating the administration of four Washington Conservation Corps (WCC) programs — including one managed by DNR — and creating the Puget SoundCorps for young adults and returning veterans, ages 18 to 25 years. Our blog on January 25, 2011, described what was envisioned.

The WCC program continues but is now administered by the Department of Ecology.

As a part of the WCC, the new Puget SoundCorps will work on projects that support the Puget Sound Partnership’s Action Agenda to restore, protect, and preserve the Sound by 2020. Many projects will supplement work DNR does in its role as manager of state trust lands that lie below Puget Sound and along many areas of the Sound’s nearshore. Corps projects are likely to include beach cleanup, removing bulkheads that are damaging habitat, removing barriers to fish passage in streams, and helping to repair or remove forest roads polluting streams with sediment. The official rollout of the Puget Sound Corps component of the WCC is set for this fall.

The WCC is now seeking 245 young adults, including military service veterans, between 18 and 25 to hire for on-the-ground projects starting this fall in several counties. In addition to an hourly wage, the rewards include a $5,550 AmeriCorps education award upon completing the service year. Applications to the WCC can be completed online.

See more of DNR’s milestones and goals.

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Year 1 Milestones: Derelict Vessel Removal Program improved

August 10, 2011
Derelict vessel

In 2010, DNR removed and disposed of 32 derelict vessels and helped other agencies remove 15 more. Photo: DNR.

This week, Ear to the Ground presents highlights from the first-year report card on DNR’s Strategic Plan goals.

Abandoned or derelict vessels in our waterways cause a number of public safety and environmental hazards, including, releasing toxic pollutants into the environment, blocking navigation, and severely damaging passing vessels. DNR’s nationally recognized Derelict Vessel Removal Program was created to help solve this toxic problem, and now it is even better.

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark requested the derelict vessel legislation that would help DNR remove these problem vessels. In 2011 the bill, SB 5271, was signed into law. It is helping DNR and partner agencies more efficiently deal with derelict vessels owners, holding them more accountable by:

  • Clarifying that knowingly causing a vessel to sink, break up, block navigational channels or contaminate the environment is grounds for a misdemeanor.
  • Providing liability immunity to public entities acting in good faith under the provisions of the Derelict Vessel Removal Act.
  • Clarifying that Ports have the same funding match that is required in RCW 79.100.
  • Allowing local governments to contract with marinas to remove abandoned vessels as they can with derelict vessels.

See more of our milestones and goals.

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Instant ugly: Illegal dumping is a BIG problem, costs you money

July 13, 2011
Capitol State Forest site

Those old computer monitors were huge! Simple old-school trick photography shows litter in Capitol State Forest that someone used for target practice. Photo: DNR.

Help us keep your forests safe and clean… clean of illegally dumped household, construction, and industrial waste, that is. 

About 200 illegal dumping sites on state trust land were located last year on our map: Illegal Dumping Sites on Washington State Trust Land. DNR’s Law Enforcement Service says that for every known site there may be two or three more that haven’t been found, were cleaned up by eager volunteers (thanks!), too difficult to reach at this time, or awaiting investigation.

Illegal dumping costs DNR around $200,000 a year. Most sites cost a few hundred dollars to clean up but the cost can rise substantially when we suspect hazardous chemicals. Also costing more to clean up are places where people dumped trash or cars into steeply sloped areas, creeks or wetlands.

Please call 911 when you spot suspicious activities on public or private lands.  

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