Posts Tagged ‘Goldmark’

Join the 9th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In

March 18, 2014
Great Gravel Pack-In

Great Gravel Pack-In volunteers are happy to help, rain or shine!
Photo by: Diana Lofflin/DNR

Join DNR staff and volunteers from a variety of recreation interests for the 9th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In, March 29 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m..

The Great Gravel Pack-In has become an annual tradition that showcases and celebrates the value of volunteers and importance of cooperative efforts. See photos from past events on the DNR Flickr page.

This Year’s Activities
Volunteers will help spread gravel and repair damaged sections of trails in Capitol State Forest. Some may also help clear storm debris and make basic improvements to Middle Waddell and Margaret McKenney campgrounds.

Join the Event

What 9th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In
When March 29, 2014
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where Capitol State Forest
Tacoma Trail Cruisers’ Property

 

 

Ron Downing at the 8th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In. Photo: Diana Lofflin, DNR.

Ron Downing at the 8th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In. Photo: Diana Lofflin, DNR.

Learn more about the Great Gravel Pack-In and other volunteer events on the DNR Volunteer Calendar.

Invite your friends on Facebook. Come volunteer and be a hero for a day!

What to Expect
Volunteers should bring work gloves, water, and rain gear to this event. A barbeque lunch will be provided by the Tacoma Trail Cruisers.

We ask that children under the age of 18 are accompanied by a parent or guardian. Also, for the safety of horses and pack stock, please do not bring dogs.

Event Partners
A special thanks to the following groups for partnering with DNR on this event:

Discover Pass logoVolunteers can get rewards
Did you know that volunteers can earn vouchers toward a complimentary Discover Pass for their service?

Get details.

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Groundbreaking research addresses innovative approaches to Douglas fir root diseases

January 23, 2014
Photo of a Douglas Fir root with laminated root rot fungus.

Close-up view of the fungus that causes laminated root rot (white stuff on root). Photo: Amy Ramsey-Kroll/DNR

Laminated root rot is becoming more of an issue in Washington State. Why? The disease affects many conifers, including Douglas fir, a vital resource for Washington’s economy and ecology.

A recently released report addresses new approaches to understanding root rot diseases, with a focus on laminated root rot Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark requested the study, which was conducted by the Washington State Academy of Sciences.

What is laminated root rot?
Laminated root rot is caused by caused by the fungus Phellinus sulphurascens and affects Douglas fir, western hemlock, and other conifers.

(more…)

Teanaway Community Forest introduces new way of managing public forestlands

October 3, 2013
Fall view of the Teanaway Community Forest, the first Washington State-managed community forest. Photo: The Wilderness Society.

Fall view of the Teanaway Community Forest, the first Washington State-managed community forest. Photo: The Wilderness Society.

This week, Washington State celebrated the formation of the first state-managed community forest, the Teanaway Community Forest.

The Teanaway Community Forest is a 50,272-acre property situated at the headwaters of the Yakima Basin watershed (map).

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is collaboratively managing the Teanaway Community Forest with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and with significant public input from a community-based advisory committee.

The Teanaway acquisition is the largest single land transaction by Washington State in 45 years and reflects more than a decade of collaboration involving many organizations and individuals. The property will become Washington’s first Community Forest under the terms of legislation enacted in 2011, a model designed to empower communities to partner with DNR to purchase forests that support local economies and public recreation.

“The Teanaway Community Forest is one of the most beloved landscapes in Washington, and it will be cared for and managed for years to come to reflect the values and priorities of the community that has worked so hard to protect it,” said Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands. “That’s the beauty of the Community Forest Trust model: it allows local communities to help protect the forests they love.”

Still have questions? Check out the Teanaway Community Forest Q & A or email them to teanaway@dnr.wa.gov

>>Sign up to receive the Teanaway Community Forest e-newsletter
>>View a media release about the purchase
>>Check out photos

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Working forests, working double-time

September 3, 2013
Many forested areas offer more than just economic value to communities. Photo: DNR.

Many forested areas offer more than just economic value to communities. Photo: DNR.

Most people know about the monetary benefits of harvesting trees from forest lands, but what people may not know are the other services forests provide. For instance:

• Forests are effective pollution filters, protecting the water we drink and the air we breathe
• Forests provide fertile and productive soil
• Forests protect against floods from large storms
• Forests reduce climate change impacts by sequestering carbon

Well, now there may be a way to better recognize the many ways that forests provide public health and safety benefits and, perhaps, compensate land managers who manage their land in a way that provides these benefits to communities.

View of Mount Loop Highway in Snohomish County. Photo: DNR.

View of Mount Loop Highway in Snohomish County. Photo: DNR.

In 2011, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) received funding for a demonstration project to test whether public water utilities could provide payments to upstream private forest landowners who are committed to protecting watershed functions related to their mission.

DNR worked with ecosystem scientists and watershed resource managers in the Nisqually and Snohomish watersheds to explore payment systems for ecosystem services.

DNR just submitted a report to the Department of Ecology on their findings. In addition to this report, the demonstration turned from a project into a long-term solution in the following instances:

 • Partners in a demonstration project in the Nisqually watershed are discussing forested properties that could help protect the City of Olympia’s new drinking water source, the McAllister Wellfield.

• The demonstration project in Snohomish County is contributing to the Snohomish Basin Protection Plan.

Special thanks to all involved in this important study which may help preserve both forest land cover and economic vitality in Washington State.

For more information on this project, please visit DNR’s Forest Watershed Services Transactions Page.

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Cle Elum community is the 100th ‘Firewise Community/USA’ in state

May 10, 2013
Goldmark in Cle Elum: May 10, 2013

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark congratulates residents of a community near Cle Elum for reducing wildfire threats to their homes. Photo: Janet Pearce/DNR.

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark joined with other officials this morning in Cle Elum to congratulate residents of Hidden Valley Meadows/Vista Community for becoming the 100th Firewise Community in the state. At a special event this morning, residents of the Kittitas County community displayed wildfire prevention techniques they put in place to protect their homes and property from fire. The Hidden Valley Meadows/Vista Community was evacuated, but spared from, last year’s destructive Taylor Bridge Fire, which came within a mile of the development.

8 steps to reduce wildfire threats

CLICK on image to see eight simple actions you can take that will greatly reduce wildfire risks to your home. Image: firewise.org.

Communities can earn national recognition from the Firewise Communities/USA® Program for taking steps to reduce wildfire threats to their homes and other structures.

Attending this morning’s event with Goldmark were several members of the media, along with representatives from the Washington Conservation Commission, Kittitas County Fire District #7, Kittitas County Commission, Kittitas County Conservation District, and Skagit Conservation District.

We’ve already had several wildfires this year in Washington State, and the fire season just begun. Here are eight things you can do this weekend to improve the odds of your home surviving a wildfire.

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Take Our Daughters and Sons To Work® at DNR

April 26, 2013
Smokey Beark DNR

Kids had the chance to meet Smokey Bear at DNR’s Take Our Daughters and Sons To Work® Day event. Photo by: DNR/Jessica Payne

Yesterday the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) celebrated Take Our Daughters and Sons To Work® Day with the children of state employees.

This year, the Take Our Daughters and Sons To Work® Foundation partnered with the National Association of State Foresters to introduce children to careers in forestry. Almost a hundred kids came out to learn about the jobs we do at DNR, the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Washington Department of Agriculture.

For half a day, the Natural Resources Building here in Olympia was transformed into an education fair featuring trees, bugs, and geodes. Kids had an opportunity to learn how foresters work in the woods and try to stump the forester with their questions. They got up close with bugs while learning about forest health from one of DNR’s entomologists.

Washington Geology Library

This little girl is proud to show off a sparkly geode at the Washington Geology Library exhibit for the event. Photo by: DNR/Jessica Payne

At the Washington Geology Library, children learned the life-cycle of a rock and identified special rocks, from geodes to the Washington state gem:petrified wood. Many kids put their directional skills to the test by learning to use a compass and trying to complete the orienteering course mapped out by DNR’s recreation staff. They were given a noble fir seedling from DNR’s Webster Nursery and practiced proper planting with the Washington Conservation Corps Urban Forestry team.

DNR bugs

These little girls got to get an up close look at the bugs that affect the health of Washington’s trees. Photo by: DNR/Jessica Payne

Participants also learned how Geographic Information System (GIS) specialists make maps and use technology to help DNR teams fight wildland fires.

They also experienced what it’s like to be a DNR firefighter by meeting some of the team, trying on personal protective equipment, and meeting Smokey Bear, who paid a special visit. Even Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark came down to meet the children, thank the volunteers, and snap a quick photo with Smokey.

View photos from the event on our Flickr page here.

DNR is happy to have had the opportunity to recruit our future generations of state land managers. If you are interested in finding out about the several types of careers that DNR has to offer, visit our jobs page and apply to work with DNR today.

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Volunteer Hero Ron Downing Honored at the 8th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In

April 17, 2013
Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark shakes the hand of Ron Downing as he receives a Volunteer Hero Award. Photo: Dana Leavitt, DNR.

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark (right) presents Ron Downing a Volunteer Hero Award. Photo: Dana Leavitt, DNR.

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark made a special appearance at the Great Gravel Pack-In volunteer event in Capitol State Forest last weekend and presented a Volunteer Hero Award to a very deserving volunteer, Ron Downing.

Ron has been a long-time volunteer for the Washington State Department of Natural Resource (DNR). He has contributed hundreds of hours to develop equestrian trails in the DNR-managed Elbe State Forest. His passion for equestrian recreation opportunities has been passed down to the numerous volunteers he organizes and trains to develop sustainable trails.

Ron is a great leader with an ability to organize reliable pack animals and riders. He has used these skills to help make the Great Gravel Pack-In a success, year after year, for the last eight years.

Commissioner Goldmark presented a certificate, a jacket, and a Volunteer Hero patch to Ron at the event he works so hard for every year.

“Ron Downing is a dedicated volunteer who inspires the best in all of us. His enthusiastic support makes events like the Great Gravel Pack-In a great success,” said Peter Goldmark. “It is a pleasure to recognize Ron’s volunteer accomplishments today.”

Volunteer Hero Award

Volunteer Hero Award recipients were selected from a pool of individuals nominated by the public in September. DNR received nominations for 19 volunteers from across the state. Two other volunteers, Tom Faubion and Bob Langley, received their award at a 2012 recreation leadership meeting in Seattle.

DNR will open nominations for the 2013 Volunteer Hero Award in September.

Ron Downing at the 8th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In. Photo: Diana Lofflin, DNR.

Ron Downing at the 8th Annual Great Gravel Pack-In. Photo: Diana Lofflin, DNR.

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Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark puts DNR’s fire equipment to the test

February 28, 2013
Peter Goldmark Compound

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark knows a lot about engines, and doesn’t hesitate to ask DNR staff tough questions to make sure this equipment is the best. Photo by: DNR/Jessica Payne

It was cold Tuesday morning when Commissioner Peter Goldmark arrived at the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Compound to examine the newest editions to the agency’s fire truck cavalry.

Although last year’s fire season may still seem fresh for most Washington residents, DNR is already gearing up for the upcoming season.

DNR is making every effort to make sure all of its firefighting equipment is in prime condition and all crew members are extensively trained.

“When the fire bell rings, this equipment gets put to the test. That is why it’s so important to ensure that we have the best possible equipment to put the fire out.” – Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark

This year, 350 seasonal workers are being hired for the 2013 fire season. They will join the 650 permanent personnel during fire training this spring. DNR will staff approximately 96 engines, 3 initial attack crews, and 5 helitack crews. Each engine carries approximately 3,000 feet of fire hose.

Commissioner Peter Goldmark

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark takes it upon himself to ensure DNR’s new fire equipment is the best possible equipment available. Photo by: DNR/Jessica Payne

DNR still has many openings for seasonal fire workers. If you would like to join the team, visit our jobs page and apply today.

Learn more about DNR’s fire program, gain wildfire information, and find out how to protect your home from potential wildfire on DNR’s Resource Protection webpage.

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Goldmark keys in on forest health and climate change; begins second term as Commissioner of Public Lands

January 17, 2013
Here are the complete Inaugural Remarks of Peter Goldmark to the Department of Natural Resources on Wednesday, January 16, 2013, at the beginning of his second term as Commissioner of Public Lands:
Peter Goldmark

Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands, delivers second inaugural address on Wednesday, January 16, 2013. Photo: Nancy Charbonneau/DNR.

Good afternoon, everyone and thank you, Lenny for that introduction and for your service to DNR and the state as Supervisor for the department. You have brought a keen understanding of many complex issues to your duties and have done a magnificent job of solving problems and providing leadership within the agency.

I would also like to thank the members of my family, who are here with us today.

It is both an honor and a privilege to be elected to a second term as Commissioner of Public Lands for the great State of Washington. We are fortunate to live and work in a state whose landscape is naturally beautiful and productive. Our state is replete with some of the earth’s most productive agricultural lands and is forested with the world’s premiere evergreen species in terms of both productivity and quality. I know this first-hand: by having lived and worked here almost all of my life; having climbed the tallest mountain; having hiked many, many miles over high mountain trails; and having visited nearly every corner of our state in both private and public life. We at DNR shoulder the responsibility of keeping these natural resources productive and beautiful for the future. Our legacy is to walk this line: to productively steward these precious natural resources in a manner that sustains a revenue stream for the trust beneficiaries and conserves that which is rare and wonderful.

Over the course of my first term in office, DNR has produced $921 million of non-tax revenue for education and other trust beneficiaries. These revenues flow mainly from timber harvested on state trust lands but also from geoduck and wheat sales. While revenue production for the trust beneficiaries is our primary mission, we also endeavor to maintain forest cover throughout the state. Thus, we have purchased 10,500 acres of lands threatened by development for working forest and permanently protected an additional 22,000 acres of land for conservation. This includes about 7,500 acres that comprise the newly designated Middle Fork Snoqualmie Natural Resources Conservation Area. This NRCA, home to many threatened and endangered species, is a unique landscape encompassing low-, mid-, and high-elevation forests, in a prime location to help meet both critical habitat needs and the growing demand for recreational opportunities.

We also reviewed over 17,000 Forest Practices Applications to ensure that rules are followed to protect aquatic resources during timber harvest and associated road construction on state and private lands.

Fire suppression is another huge responsibility at DNR. Over the past 4 years, we partnered with other jurisdictions to suppress 2,895 fires encompassing over 114,000 acres. This past fire season was particularly difficult due to very hot, dry conditions in August and September, together with a severe dry lightning storm on September 8th that sparked several hundred wildfires in eastern Washington.   (more…)

PBS report examines the effects of ocean acidity on shellfish industry

December 11, 2012
Oyster showing effects of ocean acidification.

Oysters at hatcheries in Oregon are showing the effects of ocean acidification. Photo: Oregon State University.

Since the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification announced its findings last month, there’s been a great deal of coverage on the issue. Last Friday, the Public Broadcasting System’s (PBS) “Newshour” show aired a report on how ocean acidification is having devastating effects on Washington’s shellfish industry.

The rise in acidity makes seawater corrosive to many marine organisms, especially those that require calcium in their “formative” growth stages, such as shellfish larvae. The shellfish industry, therefore, is the first to bear the brunt of the chemical changes taking place in the oceans’ pH levels. Several years ago, oyster seed production experienced a sharp drop. Corrosive seawater pumped into hatcheries was blamed for the decline.

Like climate change, ocean acidification is largely the result of increased carbon dioxide. As reported in “Newshour,” scientists estimate that the oceans have absorbed 550 billion tons of carbon dioxide, and ocean acidity has increased 30 percent for the past 200 years—since the beginning of the industrial revolution.

The “Newshour” report on ocean acidification includes interviews with Richard Feely, a chemical oceanographer with NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle; Shina Wysocki, of Chelsea Farms LLC, a family shellfish farm in Olympia; and Bill Dewey of Taylor Shellfish Farms, of Shelton and Samish Bay.

Watch the report: Trouble in the Water: Acidifying Oceans Hinder Health of Northwest Shellfish

Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark served on the governor’s panel on ocean acidification.

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