Posts Tagged ‘yakima’

Cost-share available to improve your forest’s health and reduce wildfire risks

March 10, 2014
Thinning and pruning trees helps to create a healthier forest and reduce wildfire risks. PHOTO: DNR.

Thinning and pruning trees helps to create a healthier forest and reduce wildfire risks. PHOTO: DNR.

If you have forestland in Chelan, Kittitas, Klickitat or Yakima counties, you may be eligible to receive federal help for some of the costs to reduce wildfire risks on your properties.

The cost-share program, administered by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), pays for up to half of a landowner’s cost to thin and prune trees and remove forest slash.

Many forest stands in the four-county area have grown too dense, producing weaker trees that are more susceptible to damage from pine bark beetles, western spruce budworm, and other harmful insects and diseases. Dense, overcrowded forest stands also pose wildfire risks.

Forest landowners may apply for cost-share funding online at: www.surveymonkey.com/s/dnrcostshare.

DNR foresters are available to meet with interested landowners, assess the health of their forests, and recommend forest management options. Landowners interested in discussing the cost-share program with a forester should contact:

Chuck Wytko
Southeast Region Landowner Assistance District Manager
Washington State Department of Natural Resources
509-925-0963
Charles.Wytko@dnr.wa.gov

Federally funded by the U.S. Forest Service, this program is available to forestland owners in portions of Chelan, Kittitas, Klickitat and Yakima counties where DNR has declared a Forest Health Hazard Warning. To learn more, visit: www.dnr.wa.gov/foresthealth.

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Eight Ways the Teanaway Land Purchase Affects You

October 7, 2013
Preserving wildlife viewing opportunities is just one of the ways the Teanaway purchase may affect  you. Photo: WDFW.

Preserving wildlife viewing opportunities is just one of the ways the Teanaway purchase may affect you. Photo: WDFW.

You don’t have to live in the Yakima Basin for the new Teanaway Community Forest to benefit you. This historic land purchase by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and the first community forest under 2011’s Community Forest Trust legislation, will likely impact your life in ways you may not expect.

>>Find out more about the Teanaway Community Forest.

  1. More open spaces for you to enjoy. The Community Forest management model was designed to help communities protect forest lands from being commercially developed. People across the state took a stand to protect the cherished Teanaway landscape by placing it under state management.
  2. Part of a broader vision.  The Teanaway purchase is part of the Yakima Basin Integrated Plan addressing water shortages in the Yakima Basin. The Basin Plan will increase the supply of water to irrigate crops, provide clean drinking water, and to rebuild depleted fish stocks. This vision is shared by a coalition of government agencies, irrigators, environmentalists, and more. Your forest is part of the solution.
  3. Two state agencies working for you. The DNR will jointly manage the Teanaway Community Forest with the Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This combined pool of expertise will create a land management team that is not only highly skilled but robust enough to help this vital landscape reach its full potential.
  4. Access to Recreation. The Legislature directed DNR and WDFW to maintain and, where possible, expand recreational opportunities consistent with watershed protection. That means you will still be able to enjoy your favorite outdoor activities in a landscape you love.
  5. Public input on land management. The Teanaway Community Forest Management Plan will be developed with the assistance of a Community Advisory Committee. Throughout the process there will be opportunities to make your voice heard. To get involved, sign up for the e-newsletter.
  6. Protects locally sourced produce. The Teanaway Community Forest is at the headwaters of the Yakima Basin watershed. What does that mean for you? The Yakima valley is home to one of the largest agriculture areas in the state, critical to locally sourced produce and national and international exports. Protecting the watershed will increase the water supply and drought-resistance in the valley, helping to support sustainable agriculture and local produce for all Washingtonians. 
  7. Working landscapes save local jobs. The Teanaway is home to grazing lands and forests that will eventually provide sustainable timber harvests. Revenue will be invested back into the forest, and the overall economic impact will benefit the entire state.
  8. Wildlife viewing.  The Teanaway Community Forest is due for a restoration makeover that will improve the quality of habitat available for many species including owls, eagles, deer, elk, bull trout, steelhead, and spring Chinook. Don’t forget to bring your camera on your Teanaway Community Forest adventure.

Many Washingtonians live in this state for the rich quality of life and access to outdoor opportunities. The Teanaway Community Forest is now another reason we can be proud to call Washington home.

>>Sign up to receive the Teanaway Community Forest e-newsletter
>> Check out photos

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Teanaway Community Forest introduces new way of managing public forestlands

October 3, 2013
Fall view of the Teanaway Community Forest, the first Washington State-managed community forest. Photo: The Wilderness Society.

Fall view of the Teanaway Community Forest, the first Washington State-managed community forest. Photo: The Wilderness Society.

This week, Washington State celebrated the formation of the first state-managed community forest, the Teanaway Community Forest.

The Teanaway Community Forest is a 50,272-acre property situated at the headwaters of the Yakima Basin watershed (map).

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is collaboratively managing the Teanaway Community Forest with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and with significant public input from a community-based advisory committee.

The Teanaway acquisition is the largest single land transaction by Washington State in 45 years and reflects more than a decade of collaboration involving many organizations and individuals. The property will become Washington’s first Community Forest under the terms of legislation enacted in 2011, a model designed to empower communities to partner with DNR to purchase forests that support local economies and public recreation.

“The Teanaway Community Forest is one of the most beloved landscapes in Washington, and it will be cared for and managed for years to come to reflect the values and priorities of the community that has worked so hard to protect it,” said Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands. “That’s the beauty of the Community Forest Trust model: it allows local communities to help protect the forests they love.”

Still have questions? Check out the Teanaway Community Forest Q & A or email them to teanaway@dnr.wa.gov

>>Sign up to receive the Teanaway Community Forest e-newsletter
>>View a media release about the purchase
>>Check out photos

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Winter recreation event at Ahtanum State Forest January 18 and 19

January 14, 2013
Snowmobilers in the Ahtanum

Snowmobilers in the DNR-managed Ahtanum area in Yakima County. Photo: DNR

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) would like to invite you to Ahtanum State Forest near Yakima on January 18 & 19 to find out about winter recreation opportunities.

Recreation managers will be hosting the event and will be available to answer your winter recreation questions. They will also have maps and can help you find the best adventure for your group.  Snowmobilers will find lots of resources on opportunities and safety precautions when using groomed trails.

Snacks, hot beverages, and a warm fire will be available to warm you up if you decide to go try out the trails. This will also be a great opportunity to meet others who enjoy winter sports.

Event Details

When:   January 18 & 19
                8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Where: Ahtanum State Forest in the Whites Ridge Parking lot (map).

Don’t forget your Discover Pass, your ticket to millions of acres of recreation opportunities on Washington state-managed recreation lands.

winter _rec

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Hold your horses! Barbecue Flats area closed

May 23, 2012

Getting ready for Memorial Day adventures? Be sure to adjust your plans if you had planned on heading to Barbecue Flats dispersed recreation area in Yakima County— public access is closed.

DNR is working with other landowners to restore public access to this popular area, so stay tuned.

We recommend Cascade Camp as your best alternative for your hiking and equestrian adventures (see map for details).

Warning: There is no turn-around point once you hit the road closure.

What’s worse than being up a creek without a paddle? Driving a horse trailer to a road closure without a turn-around point.

On a more serious note, we are concerned about public safety. Please forward this blog to those you know who may want to visit this area.

The road closure is on Meloy Road, one mile from the junction of Wenas and Audubon Roads.

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