DNR weekend reading: Combating ocean acidification, farming dryland, and volcano tourism

PHOTO: Mount Rainier as seen from a solar-powered radio repeater that DNR operates on Puyallup Ridge to provide primary radio coverage to its foresters and other staff along with Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers that work in the area. (The site is open to cross-country skiers in the winter as part of the Mount Tahoma Trails system.) Photo: Andy Osborn/DNR.
PHOTO: Mount Rainier as seen from a solar-powered radio repeater that DNR operates on Puyallup Ridge to provide primary radio coverage to its foresters and other staff along with Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers that work in the area. (The site is open to cross-country skiers in the winter as part of the Mount Tahoma Trails system.) Photo: Andy Osborn/DNR.

We start December with a weekend on which you can peruse these selected articles for your DNR weekend reading:

Nature: Washington State Declares War on Ocean Acidification
Washington state, a leading U.S. producer of farmed shellfish, has launched a $3.3-million, science-based plan–the first US state-funded effort to tackle ocean acidification–to address this growing problem for the region and the globe. (Also covered in Scientific American.)

Scientific American: Dryland Farmers Work Wonders without Water in U.S. West
A generation of extremely efficient farmers increasingly sees irrigation as a non-viable alternative while mulling over a switch from water-intense cotton and wheat to rain-fed sorghum and grains

Arbiter Online: Geothermal now heating up campus
The City of Boise has operated a geothermal district heating system since 1983, serving 81 buildings. Now, the environmentally-friendly geothermal heat is flowing to heat buildings on the Boise State campus.

Sydney Morning Herald: Volcano eruptions ‘a positive’ for NZ tourism
New Zealand tourism operators are hoping the “significant probability” that Mt. Tongariro will erupt again in the next week could be good for their business… as long as the eruption doesn’t go on too long or cause the cancellation of flights to regional airports.

Science Daily: Cutting Real Christmas Trees Less Environmentally Harmful Than Using an Artificial One for Six Years, Biologists Say
Plant biologist Clint Springer, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, says that buying a real Christmas tree may not solve the world’s climate ills, but it is better than using an artificial one for a few years and tossing it.

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