DNR weekend reading: Invasive grasses and climate models point to more wildfires

Conifer trees in the central Cascade Mountains show signs of damage by mountain pine beetles. Photo: DNR
Conifer trees in the central Cascade Mountains show signs of damage by mountain pine beetles. Photo: DNR

Penn StateInvasive grass fuels increased fire activity in the West
Cheatgrass, an invasive grass species, may be one reason fires are bigger and more frequent in certain regions of the western United States, according to a team of researchers.

NASAClimate Models Project Increase in U.S. Wildfire Risk
Scientists using NASA satellite data and climate models have projected drier conditions likely will cause increased fire activity across the United States in coming decades.

Science Daily: World’s Big Trees Are Dying: Alarming Increase in Death Rates Among Trees 100-300 Years Old
A report by three of the world’s leading ecologists in the latest issue of the journal Science warns of an alarming increase in deathrates among trees 100-300 years old in many of the world’s forests, woodlands, savannahs, farming areas and even in cities.

University of California, Santa Cruz: Mercury in coastal fog linked to upwelling of deep ocean water
An ongoing investigation of elevated mercury levels in coastal fog in California suggests that upwelling of deep ocean water along the coast brings mercury to the surface, where it enters the atmosphere and is absorbed by fog.

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