Is there a link between tree health and human health?

This red oak tree helps cool and freshen the air, mitigate stormwater runoff, reduce stress and anxiety, increase property values, and so much more.
This red oak tree helps cool and freshen the air, mitigate stormwater runoff, reduce stress and anxiety, increase property values, and so much more.

A new study from the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station is suggesting yet another compelling link between the presence of trees and human health. Could this link be so strong that a poorly-treed community might actually suffer higher rates of cardiovascular disease and death among people? The author of the study, Geoffrey Donovan, believes this may be true.

While Donovan’s results imply higher rates of cardiovascular disease and death in communities where the tree canopy has been decimated by Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), Donovan is careful to emphasize that his results are not causational, but they are highly correlated.

A summary of this study, as written by Marie Oliver, can be found here.

Humans intuitively understand the value of trees to their physical and mental health. Trees make our cities and towns much more livable. They cool and freshen the air, mitigate stormwater runoff, reduce stress and anxiety, increase property values, and so much more.

Other benefits of trees are often not obvious. Trees turn sunlight into food sources for insects, wildlife and people; they supply wood for fuel, furniture and homes; and they provide beauty for all of us.

DNR’s Urban and Community Forestry Program is raising awareness about the benefits of trees in communities. Join local efforts so your city can benefit from the healthy quality of life that trees can offer.

Still in doubt? Pick a tree in your neighborhood, measure the diameter, and find out exactly what benefits it provides. You’ll be happily surprised!

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