Celebrate National Public Lands Day with a beautiful new bridge

DNR's Lower High Point Creek trail bridge connects the 15-mile Tiger Mountain Trail. Photo: Sam Jarrett/ DNR.
DNR’s Lower High Point Creek Trail Bridge connects the 15-mile Tiger Mountain Trail. Photo: Sam Jarrett/ DNR.

Not only is today National Public Lands Day, but it also marks the reopening of our full 15-mile Tiger Mountain Trail thanks to a new 200-foot bridge that can better withstand flooding.

A destination in itself, the Lower High Point Creek Trail Bridge provides views into the High Point Creek drainage from about 30 feet up and connects a continuous trail across the West Tiger Mountain Natural Resources Conservation Area and the Tiger Mountain State Forest.

Enjoy a roughly two-and-a-half-mile hike on the Tiger Mountain Trail from the High Point Trailhead to access the bridge.

The Tiger Mountain Trail meanders through a diverse forest canopy and healthy understory. It changes from a hiking-specific trail in west Tiger Mountain to horseback riding and hiking trail as it reaches south Tiger Mountain. The Issaquah Alps Trails Club was instrumental with building the majority of the trail’s original route.

Lower High Point Creek trail bridge
To access the Lower High Point Creek Trail Bridge, start at the High Point Trailhead and continue on the Tiger Mountain Trail for about two-and-a-half-miles. Photo: Sam Jarrett/ DNR.

The bridge construction is largely possible through a Federal Emergency Management Agency grant, Washington Recreation and Conservation Office grant, DNR recreation funds and a $10,000 donation from the family of Murat Danishek, who passed away of a heart condition in his early thirties.  The family’s donation is a fitting tribute to honor Murat, who often accompanied his family & friends exploring the hiking trails of the West Tiger Mountain Natural Resources Conservation Area and surrounding Snoqualmie Corridor.

Visiting public lands can be such a pleasure, especially on National Public Lands Day. This bridge will will help enable the public’s access to such experiences for years to come.

For more information about hiking and horseback riding on DNR-managed lands, visit our website. To hear more about upcoming trail projects and developments, subscribe to our monthly recreation e-newsletter. View this month’s issue.

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