DNR burn ban expired; still a need for fire caution

Cougar Creek Fire, which started Aug. 10, 2015 by lightning, scorched 53,532 acres near Mount Adams. Photo Joe Smillie/DNR
Cougar Creek Fire, which started Aug. 10, 2015 by lightning, scorched 53,532 acres near Mount Adams. Photo Joe Smillie/DNR

Even though recent rains and lower temperatures have reduced fire danger, some parts of eastern Washington are still dry.

When you’re out this weekend hunting or recreating, remember to:

  • Check with a camp host or landowner to see if campfires are allowed.
  • If a campfire is allowed, don’t leave it to smolder.
  • Keep it small and have a bucket of water, as to not let it get out of hand.
  • After a campfire, be sure to extinguish it completely until it’s cold to the touch.

If you are hunting, check out our forest road survival safety tips from DNR’s Ear to the Ground blog. For hunting, visit the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website. Also, don’t forget a Discover Pass, your gateway to exploring Washington’s great outdoors. 

County burn bans may still be in effect in various locations throughout Washington.  Check with your community fire district for local information. Before burning outdoors, check to see if there are any fire restrictions for your area.

In addition, industrial forest operations on DNR-protected lands remain regulated under the requirements of the Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) system. If you’re involved in forest operations, check for and follow restrictions as they apply to the area you will be working.

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