2015: A great year for volunteer partnerships

Partner organizations are extremely important to DNR’s ability to provide recreation access to the lands we manage on behalf of trust beneficiaries. The work of our volunteers is expected to exceed a value of $1.2 million last year alone¹. Here are just a few examples of how fortunate we are to be working with incredible groups, and people, across the state of Washington to enhance quality of life for everyone.

Washington Trails Association volunteers maintaining the trail to Oyster Dome. Photo/ Washington Trails Association.
Washington Trails Association volunteers maintaining the trail to Oyster Dome. Photo/ Washington Trails Association.

Washington Trails Association
Washington Trails Association (WTA) helps maintain many of DNR’s most popular recreation opportunities, such as trails in West Tiger Mountain Natural Resources Conservation Area and Oyster Dome, in the Blanchard Forest Block.

North Central ATV
Based in Okanogan County, North Central ATV Club is committed to stewardship and from May to October  hosts bi-weekly volunteer events to maintain DNR trails and campgrounds, including the Rock Lake, Rock Creek and Leader Lake campgrounds in the Loup Loup Forest Block.

Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust volunteer pose for a photo on Little Si. Photo/ Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust
Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust volunteers pose for a photo on Little Si. Photo/ Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust

Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust
Based in Seattle, the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust helps to conserve and enhance landscapes in the Greenway, which include some of DNR’s most-loved recreation locations, such as Mailbox Peak, Mount Si Natural Resources Conservation Area, and Tiger Mountain State Forest. In partnership with DNR, the Greenway Trust and its dedicated volunteers are working to maintain and repair trails on Little Si and Tiger Mountain.

Back Country Horsemen of Washington
The Back Country Horsemen of Washington (BCHW) members volunteer more 60,000 hours each year and help organize DNR’s Great Gravel Pack-In each year to harden trails in the Capitol State Forest. Chapters also organize work parties to maintain and improve campgrounds, trailheads, and trails on DNR-managed lands throughout the year. Last year, BCHW also worked with DNR to improve BBQ Flats in the Wenas area north of Yakima.

Timber Tamers
The Timber Tamers, a four-wheel drive club based out of Western Washington, partner with DNR to care for trails in the Walker Valley Off-Road Vehicle Area, near Mount Vernon. Most recently, they helped to build about 100-feet of post and rail fence to protect sensitive meadow land at Walker Valley.

American Whitewater was one of many groups to give back to DNR-managed lands. Photo/ American Whitewater.
American Whitewater was one of many groups to give back to DNR-managed lands. Photo/ American Whitewater.

American Whitewater
American Whitewater has about 3,000 members in Washington state and has been actively engaged in planning and volunteer efforts to enhance the recreational facilities within DNR’s Middle Fork Snoqualmie Natural Resources Conservation Area. American Whitewater volunteers also helped build a trail to access the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River.

Watch This Fourwheelerz
Watch This Fourwheelerz Club
‘s 30 members are regular volunteers with DNR’s Elbe Hills ORV Monthly Work Party. The Orting-based club partners with DNR to design and maintain obstacles within the 13-mile Elbe Hills ORV Trail System. Projects include the log crawl on the Gotcha Trail, as well as new rocks on the Alder and Mainline trails.

The Access Fund and Washington Climbers Coalition led more than 65 volunteers over two days to cut a more sustainable trail to Dirty Harry's Balcony. Photo/ Access Fund.
The Access Fund and Washington Climbers Coalition led more than 65 volunteers over two days to cut a more sustainable trail to Dirty Harry’s Balcony. Photo/ Access Fund.

Washington Climbers Coalition and Access Fund 
In June, Washington Climbers Coalition, Access Fund, and DNR began an effort to reroute an eroded trail that leads up to Dirty Harry’s Balcony and the Exit 38 Far Side climbing area. With additional support from the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, the Vertical World Climbing Youth Team, The Mountaineers, and others, the Access Fund and Washington Climbers Coalition led more than 65 volunteers over two days to cut a new, sustainable trail away from an old eroded roadbed historically used by hikers and climbers. Washington Climbers Coalition and Access Fund have also been involved with trail projects on DNR’s Little Si, a popular sport climbing area in the Snoqualmie Corridor, and with stewardship at the Gold Bar boulders, near Gold Bar.

Puget Sound Trialers
The Puget Sound Trialers have more than 90 members and help to care for the a trials bike area in the Reiter Foothills Forest. In October, the club installed a trials area sign and other boundary signs to reinforce the specific area for trials bike use.

The Cold Creek Mountain Bikers work on a trail kiosk for the Thrillium Trail. Photo courtesy Cold Creek Mountain Bikers.
The Cold Creek Mountain Bikers work on a trail kiosk for the Thrillium Trail. Photo/ Cold Creek Mountain Bikers.

Cold Creek Mountain Bikers
Based in Battleground and Vancouver, Cold Creek Mountain Bikers has about 250 members who care for trails in Yacolt Burn State Forest. The Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance chapter just finished marking a future connector trail from the new lower Yacolt Burn trailhead parking area to the Thrillium trail exit. The completed trail, scheduled for construction in early 2016, will allow riders to skip forest roads in favor of added single track.

We love sharing the amazing work of our partners. If you know of a group we should feature, please let us know.

To learn more about volunteering on DNR-managed lands visit our website. To find an event near you, visit our calendar.

     1. Based on Bureau of Labor Statistics data and DNR’s volunteer hours from January 2015 through September 2015.

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