Puget SoundCorps members remove creosoted waste from Shipwreck Point conservation area

The chainsaw uses vegetable based bar oil, and the creosote-soaked shavings generated by sawing were contained with plastic bags and sheeting. Photo DNR
The chainsaw uses vegetable based bar oil, and the creosote-soaked shavings generated by sawing were contained with plastic bags and sheeting. Photo DNR

More than 10 tons of creosote-soaked logs were removed from the beach at the Shipwreck Point conservation area through the hard work of a Puget SoundCorps crew sponsored by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

Shipwreck Point is one of 36 DNR-managed natural resources conservation areas throughout Washington that protect scenic and ecologically significant sites. It features one of the last easily accessible stretches of beach on the Strait of Juan de Fuca between Port Angeles and Neah Bay. Pullouts on Highway 112 offer beautiful views and panoramas of both the Strait and Vancouver Island. More details about the conservation area can be found at http://www.dnr.wa.gov/ShipwreckPoint/.

Shipwreck Point NRCA shoreline. Photo DNR
Shipwreck Point NRCA shoreline. Photo DNR

Puget SoundCorps crew members joined forces during the May cleanup to muscle wayward pilings and large wood fragments entangled with driftwood piles. Crew members used shovels, Pulaskis and timber carriers. Crew members moved the contaminated wood to plastic-lined disposal areas and loaded it on to ATVs for removal.

Creosote logs have been accumulating along the Strait of Juan de Fuca shoreline long enough that much of the creosote removed by corps members was buried in sand and debris, some even sporting willow tree sprouts of their own. The creosote-leaching wood is now at an approved landfill, accompanied by tires, Styrofoam and other trash collected by the crew.

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