Posts Tagged ‘Recreation’

Celebrate Fourth of July by cooling off on DNR-managed land

July 2, 2015

DNR has more than 160 recreation sites across the state that are perfect for cooling off this holiday weekend. Read on for some ideas on where to beat the heat at our sites with water access.

As you plan your trip, keep in mind DNR’s statewide burn ban. Campfires and all outdoor burning activites are currently prohibited on state forests  and anywhere else on the 13 million acres of Washington forestlands DNR protects from wildfire.

Remember — fireworks are illegal on all DNR-protected lands.
Play it safe Washington.  Learn more. http://bit.ly/WaWildfireRisk

Yahoo Lake, Olympic Peninsula

Yahoo Lake, in DNR’s Olympic Region, has opportunities for fishing, boating, and swimming. Photo/ DNR.

Yahoo Lake, Olympic Peninsula, near Olympic National Park 
At 2,400-feet elevation, the remote Yahoo Lake Campground provides opportunities for hiking, fishing, and swimming during a stay at one of its three campsites.

Lily and Lizard Lakes, Blanchard Forest, near Bellingham
Enjoy a swim at one of Blanchard Forest’s backcountry campsites. Watch for views of Samish Bay and the San Juan Islands on the hike to these forested lakes.

Howell Lake, Tahuya State Forest, near Bremerton 
This day-use site in the Tahuya State Forest is great for fishing, swimming, and picnicking. Access the lake from the Howell Lake Trail.

Dougan Falls, Yacolt Burn State Forest

Enjoy the gentle, cascading falls of Yacolt Burn State Forest’s Dougan Falls. Photo/ DNR.

Dougan Creek, Yacolt Burn State Forest, near Washougal
The large boulders, forested edges, and cascading 100-foot waterfalls of Dougan Creek are a treat for picnickers and campers who visit Yacolt Burn State Forest.

Palmer Lake Campground, Loomis State Forest, Okanogan area
Palmer Lake Campground is near a 2,100-acre lake surrounded by orchards and mountainous terrain. It is a popular site for boating.

Island Camp, Glenwood Forest, near White Salmon
Island Camp, along Bird Creek, is a perfect campground for exploring Mount Adams.

Remember to bring a Discover Pass, your ticket to Washington’s great outdoors. You can purchase the Discover Pass online, from more than 600 licensed vendors across Washington state, or at automated pay stations in select state parks.

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Thanks to our Forest Watch volunteers

June 7, 2015

Did you know DNR has dedicated volunteers who work specifically to encourage safe and fun recreation on DNR-managed lands?

Our Forest Watch volunteers act as a safe presence in DNR recreation areas and help DNR respond to potentially unsafe situations quickly. Next time you see a Forest Watch volunteer, be sure to thank them for their service.

Forest Watch volunteers help encourage safe recreation in the Capitol State Forest. Photo/ DNR.

Forest Watch volunteers help encourage safe recreation in the Capitol State Forest. Photo/ DNR.

Forest Watch volunteers

  • Provide information to visitors.
  • Monitor and observe trails, sites, and facilities.
  • Document and report safety concerns and suspicious or criminal activities.

Want to use your skills to be a Forest Watch volunteer?

Forest watch volunteers gain valuable experience serving visitors to DNR-managed lands.  They can also put their hours toward a free Discover Pass. Visit our website for more information.

To stay involved with our Recreation program, sign up for our monthly recreation e-newsletter.

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Shout out: DNR staff recognized for trail work

June 5, 2015

One of our recreation staff received national recognition in late May for his outstanding contributions to trail planning, developing, and building. Sam Jarrett, who works in DNR’s South Puget Sound region, received American Trails’ national award, the 2015 Trail Work Award, and manages recreation in one the state’s most-loved landscapes, the Snoqualmie Corridor.

Sam Jarrett, who manages recreation in DNR's landscapes in the Snoqualmie Corridor, received a 2015 Trail Worker award from American Trails. Photo/ American Trails.

Sam Jarrett, who manages recreation in DNR’s landscapes in the Snoqualmie Corridor, received a 2015 Trail Worker award from American Trails. Photo/ American Trails.

This area includes Tiger Mountain State Forest, the Mount Si Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA), the Middle Fork NRCA, West Tiger Mountain NRCA and the Rattlesnake Mountain Scenic Area, and receives 800,000-plus visits each year. Sam uses his nine years of DNR recreation experience to create a legacy of recreational trail experiences on this landscape visitors can enjoy for years to come.

Off-the-Grid Trail in Tiger Mountain State Forest.

Mountain biker enjoying the Off-the-Grid Trail in Tiger Mountain State Forest. Photo/ DNR.

Sam was nominated by one of DNR’s partners, the Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance (EMBA). EMBA and DNR are working together to develop premier mountain biking opportunities in the corridor, such as east Tiger Mountain’s 15-mile system and future opportunities in the Raging River State Forest.

Sam has also helped to continue partnerships with the Washington Trails Association, the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, and offer volunteer opportunities for the public to get involved, too.

Want to see the trails for yourself? With so many recreation opportunities, like Mailbox Peak, Mount Si, Rattlesnake Mountain Scenic Area, and Tiger Mountain State Forest, it’s easy to spend a day exploring the Snoqualmie Corridor. Visit our website to see what’s open and closed before you make the drive.

Visit our Snoqualmie Corridor Recreation Plan to learn more about recreation planning in the Snoqualmie Corridor.

Stay connected to DNR’s Recreation program by signing up for our monthly recreation e-newsletter.

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Safer summer fun: Help prevent wildfires

June 4, 2015

Want to know how you can reduce your chance of accidentally starting a wildfire while enjoying the outdoors? Click the image below and use the arrows below to follow along.

campfire

Before leaving home, always check to find out what the campfire restrictions are for the area you plan to visit. Contact the landowner of the property, whether it’s state land, federal land, a campground, or private land.

If campfires are allowed, extinguish them properly when you leave:

  1. Drown the fire thoroughly with water.
  2. Stir until cold.
  3. Drown the fire again and stir
  4. Never leave a campfire unattended at any time.
  5. Never leave a campfire until it is completely out and cool to the touch.

Please take the time to completely put out your campfire; a little extra care takes only a few minutes – but could prevent a wildfire. Remember, if it’s too hot to touch, it’s too hot to leave.

Learn more about how to have safe trips to DNR-managed lands with our guide to safe and fun recreation.

Look for this interactive guide and more in this month’s recreation e-newsletter.

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Celebrate National Running Day with DNR

June 3, 2015

Looking for your next favorite running route? Lace up your shoes and try out these popular running trails on DNR-managed land:

Trail runners begin running at the Rock Candy Trailhead. Photo/ DNR.

Trail runners begin running at the Rock Candy Trailhead. Photo/ DNR.

Foothills Trail, near Port Angeles
Just below Hurricane Ridge and 5 miles south of Port Angeles, the 6.5-mile Foothills Trail is open to hikers, horseback riders, mountain bikers, and motorcycles.

Capitol Peak, Capitol State Forest, near Olympia
Located at 2,559 feet, Capitol Peak offers views of the Cascade Range, Olympic Mountains, and Puget Sound inlets.

Tarbell Trail, Yacolt Burn State Forest, near Camas
Trail runners frequent this 35-mile trail system, open to hikers, mountain bikers, and horseback riders. Part of the trail has been in existence for more than 100 years.

Trail runners enjoy the Grey Rock Trail in the Ahtanum State Forest. Photo/ DNR.

Trail runners enjoy the Grey Rock Trail in the Ahtanum State Forest. Photo/ DNR.

Oyster Dome, Blanchard Forest, near Bellingham
The Oyster Dome Trail, open to hikers, provides access to the Chuckanut Mountains and Blanchard Forest. A steep climb will provide breathaking views of Samish Bay and the islands.

Visit our recreation guide to find other DNR-managed recreation opportunities near you.

Stay in the know with DNR’s Recreation program by subscribing to our monthly recreation e-newsletter.

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Celebrate National Trails Day with DNR

May 30, 2015

Mark your calendars. Next Saturday, June 6 is American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day and we’re celebrating with volunteer events across the state.

Use our list below to find an event in your area. Remember, you can use your hours toward a Discover Pass. Visit our volunteer calendar for directions and contact information.

Tiger Mountain State Forest recreation trail maintenance

Volunteers work on trails in Tiger Mountain State Forest. Photo/DNR.

Sahara Creek Campground Work Party, near Elbe
8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Saturday, June 6
Join DNR staff, volunteers, and partners from the Pierce County chapter of the Back Country Horsemen of Washington to care for horseback riding and hiking trails in Elbe Hills State Forest.

Friends of Capitol Forest Work Party, near Olympia
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 6
Join DNR staff, volunteers, and partners from Friends of Capitol Forest to celebrate National Trails Day. This monthly event typically concludes with a mountain bike ride on Capitol State Forest trails.

National Trails Day on Tiger Mountain, near Issaquah
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 6
Join DNR staff, volunteers, and partners from the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust to help care for trails on tiger mountain. Sign up with the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust.

National Trails Day at BBQ Flats, near Yakima
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 6
Join DNR staff to work on tearing down old fence, building new fence, and preparing BBQ Flats for summer recreation.

Volunteers remove invasive Scott's Broom weeds from Mima Mounds Natural Area Preserve on National Public Lands Day (Sept. 26, 2009). Photo: Nancy Charbonneau/ DNR.

Volunteers remove invasive Scott’s Broom weeds from Mima Mounds Natural Area Preserve on National Public Lands Day (Sept. 26, 2009). Photo/DNR.

National Trails Day in Blanchard Forest, near Bellingham
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 6
Join DNR staff and partners from the North Cascade Soaring Club, the Back Country Horsemen, Pacific Northwest Trail Association and Whatcom Mountain Bike Coalition for a work day in Blanchard Forest.

Want to celebrate National Trails Day everyday? Check out our volunteer calendar.

To stay in the loop with DNR’s Recreation program, sign up for our monthly recreation e-newsletter.

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Six reasons why it’s great to be outside near Port Angeles

May 28, 2015

Port Angeles is currently one of the last four towns in the running for America’s Best Town in Outside Magazine’s fifth annual Best Town Ever contest. Here are six reasons why we know it’s a great place to be outside.

Murdock Beack is a DNR-managed beach access site near Port Angeles. Photo/ DNR.

Murdock Beack is a DNR-managed beach access site near Port Angeles. Photo/ DNR.

Murdock Beach, near Port Angeles 
Murdock Beach, located on the Strait of Juan de Fuca, gives visitors a view of Vancouver Island. This is the only public beach access for 12 miles between Camp Hayden and the East Twin River.

Striped Peak Vista and Trailhead, near Port Angeles 
Striped Peak Vista and Trailhead offers a spectacular view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Vancouver Island. The trail takes hikers through mature Douglas-fir trees, alongside a waterfall, and to a rocky cove on the Strait.

Foothills Trailhead, near Port Angeles
The Foothills Trail system includes 6 miles of ORV trails. It is nestled below Hurricane Ridge, approximately 5 miles south of Port Angeles.

Lyre River, near Port Angeles
Located on the Olympic Peninsula, this campground is offers fishing from the nearby Lyre River.

Sadie Creek, near Port Angeles, offers off-road vehicle riding opportunities. Photo/DNR.

Sadie Creek, near Port Angeles, offers off-road vehicle riding opportunities. Photo/ DNR.

Sadie Creek, near Port Angeles
Sadie Creek Trailhead, a 30-mile trail and road system on the Olympic Peninsula. The trail climbs to about 2,500 feet, giving visitors views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Vancouver and the San Juan Islands.

Little River Trail, near Port Angeles
The Little River Trail begins just a few miles west of Port Angeles and provides access to Hurricane Ridge and the northern end of Olympic National Park. It winds through mature hemlock trees and alpine meadows.

Head to our Olympic Region recreation Web page for more information about year-round recreation opportunities on the Olympic Peninsula.

Want to stay in the loop with DNR’s Recreation program? Subscribe to our monthly e-newsletter. This month’s recreation e-news features DNR’s Dry Hill, also near Port Angeles.

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Love to camp? Live the dream and become a DNR camp host

May 26, 2015

Are you a professional, friendly and polite person who wishes you could go camping for weeks on end? Do you have a properly-insured motor home, camper or travel trailer that supports comfortable camping in rustic, natural areas? DNR might have just the thing for you.

We’re currently taking applications for campground hosts to help provide a positive, safe, and informative experience for visitors at DNR campgrounds statewide.

Host responsibilities include:

  • Be professional, friendly, and polite when interacting with the public.
  • Provide information and rules to campers and visitors.
  • Register overnight campers.
  • Patrol campground and recreational areas.
  • Regularly inspect campground restrooms, picnic shelters, campsites, campfire pits and boat launch areas.
  • Report vandalism, illegal or abusive behavior.

Pick your site today!

Ahtanum State Forest view

View of Mount Rainier from Ahtanum State Forest. Photo: DNR

Ahtanum Campground, Ahtanum State Forest, near Yakima
Ahtanum Campground is a highly used recreation area for off-road vehicle riding, hiking, and horseback riding. Winter recreation is also popular for snowshoeing, sledding, cross country skiing, and snowmobiling.

Cold Creek Campground, Yacolt Burn State Forest, near Camas
Cold Creek Campground is open year-round and is a favorite for family tent camping, equestrian use, mountain biking, and hiking. For more information, check out our flier.

Jim Davis, a Tahuya and Green Mountain Committee Member, gets ready for a trail ride in Tahuya State Forest. Photo: Herb Gerhardt.

Jim Davis, a Tahuya and Green Mountain Committee Member, gets ready for a trail ride in Tahuya State Forest. Photo: Herb Gerhardt.

Tahuya River Horse Camp, Tahuya State Forest, near Belfair
This site provides camping opportunities for primarily non-motorized recreationists including equestrian and fishing enthusiasts.

For more information about campground hosting with DNR, including who to contact and how to apply, visit our camp host Web page.

To stay in the loop with DNR’s Recreation program, subscribe to our monthly recreation e-newsletter.

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Shout out to our volunteers: 2015 Pick Up the Burn

May 21, 2015

ORV riders, mountain bikers, horseback riders and hikers joined together in early May for the 13th annual Pick Up the Burn.

Each year dedicated volunteers help to care for the Yacolt Burn State Forest and pitch in to tackle illegal dumping in the forest. This year, about 150 people turned out, gathered, and hauled more than 40 cubic yards of litter from the Yacolt Burn State Forest.

Watch our short clip below to see more of this year’s Pick Up the Burn.

Want to know more about DNR’s recreation program? Check out this month’s recreation e-newsletter, and sign up to receive future updates right to your email.

 

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Sun, fun, and ORVs: Your motorized recreation guide

May 19, 2015

Did you know DNR has more than 400 miles of ORV trails ready for you to explore this summer? Follow this guide to fun and safe motorized recreation and enjoy spending your summer off-road vehicle riding on DNR-managed land.

Use the arrows to navigate or select the "autoplay" button on the bottom right. Full screen recommended.

Use the arrows to navigate or select the “autoplay” button on the bottom right. Full screen recommended.

Have a site in mind? Head to our website to see what’s open and closed.

Want to stay in the loop with DNR’s recreation program? Subscribe to our monthly recreation e-newsletter.

Remember to bring your Discover Pass, your ticket to Washington’s Great Outdoors.

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